Amannisahan(1993)

AmanisahanPic2

One of the film’s characteristic muqam scenes

Amannisahan (Chinese: 阿曼尼萨罕) is a film based on the real-life story of Amannisa Khan Nafisi, a sixteenth-century muqam singer, and later, queen of Yarkhand.

Contents
Production
Directors
Writer
Cinematographer
Cast
Synopsis
Themes

Production
Tianshan 天山 Film Studio, 1993

Directors
Wang Yan 王炎 and Wang Xingjun 王星军

Writer
Saifuddin Azizi سەيپىدىن ئەزىزى 赛福鼎·艾则孜, former Chairman of the Xinjiang Autonomous Region, and at the time of publication, a vice-chairman in the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference. Azizi accompanied Mao on his 1949-1950 trip to Moscow to negotiate the Sino-Soviet Treaty of Friendship.

Cinematographer
Zou Jixun, also known for Regret for the Past, Xu Mao and his Daughters, and Blue Flowers

Cast

  • Munire Mulading 穆尼热·木拉丁plays Amannisa Khan

Tuerxunjiang 图尔逊江 and Shadike Nijiati 沙迪克·尼加提 portray leading men.

Synopsis
Young Amannisa, born to a peasant family, is a beautiful and gifted performer. One day, her beauty and singing captivate the prince Abdurashid Khan while he is out hunting. Eventually, the two marry. Although she is now a princess, Amannisa Khan continues to face discrimination because of her humble origins. She strives to gain acceptance in the royal court by mastering Muqam ئۇيغۇر ئون ئىككى مۇقامى or Weiwuer Mukamu 维吾尔木卡姆, a traditional form of Uyghur music. With the encouragement of her husband, Amannisa Khan dedicates her life to learning, collectaing, and compiling Muqam scripts.

Persuading Uncle to play

 

Themes
Amannisa Han provides an snapshot of the dynamics of cultural negotiation between the Han-Chinese film industry and the cultural aspirations of the Uyghur nation. In the film, Mugam music is used to present a combined Han-Chinese and Uyghur examination of the Uyghur nation. It provides a point of contrast between Uyghur and Chinese cultures. There is a timelessness to the narrative that is disrupted only by the presence of a Ming official, a prominent audience member in the court during a scene featuring a music and dance performance; it is the only indication of historical time within the film. The Ming official is also depicted as a complete foreigner: he has been invited to the Khan’s palace for the concert whose purpose is to put the rich culture and wealth of the kingdom on display. The kingdom portrayed in the film is not simply Xinjiang, a province of China, but Uyghuristan, an independent nation.